Aspirin: May make you feel drunker AND prevent liver damage

 
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Mild Thing



Joined: 18 Sep 2007
Posts: 2706

PostPosted: Wed Dec 08, 2010 5:01 am    Post subject: Aspirin: May make you feel drunker AND prevent liver damage Reply with quote

Disclaimer:

I'm not condoning irresponsible behavior or recommending mixing drugs and alcohol here, just passing on some info I found in some articles.

I decided to look up "aspirin and alcohol" as I was going through my cabinets and found an unopened bottle of baby aspirin I forgot I had. I've considered taking aspirin for it's blood thinning properties, but was uncertain about the safety (stomach bleeding, potential liver problems) that may preclude me from taking it, as I am fond of my evening cocktails.

Quote:
Mealtime aspirin may boost alcohol high - side effect of trying to prevent hangover with aspirin

Mealtime aspirin may boost alcohol high

People who attempt to avoid hangovers by popping aspirin before drinking may be in for an unexpected side effect. New research suggests that aspirin, when taken on a full stomach, can get you drunker.

Physicians recruited five healthy men and gave them alcohol-spiked orange juice--the equivalent of 1.25 to 2 glasses of wine, depending on body weight--one hour after a full breakfast. On another morning, the men took 1 gram (two extra-strength tablets) of aspirin along with the same meal and then drank the same amount of alcohol.

The aspirin increased the men's peak blood alcohol level by an average of 34 percent compared with the peak level without aspirin, report Risto Roine, Charles S. Lieber and their colleagues at the Bronx Veterans Affairs Medical Center and the Mount Sinai School of Medicine in New York City. Moreover, the researchers observed that blood alcohol levels rose more rapidly and remained elevated longer after the aspirin dose.

They note that the aspirin-boosted alcohol levels fell below U.S. legal limits for "driving while intoxicated," since the study involved relatively small alcohol doses. However, they write in the Nov. 14 JOURNAL OF THE AMERICAN MEDICAL ASSOCIATION, "This increase . . . can be of clinical significance for individuals driving cars or operating other machinery that requires a high degree of mental and motor coordination."

During in vitro studies of gastric mucosa from rats and humans, the team uncovered a likely mechanism for the enhanced alcohol levels. Aspirin, they found, halved the activity of gastric alcohol dehydrogenase -- an enzyme that helps oxidize alcohol, preventing its absorption into the bloodstream. With enzyme activity subdued, more alcohol reaches the circulation, they assert.

With or without a predose of aspirin, alcohol consumed on an empty stomach also circumvents enzyme activity, passing into the bloodstream so rapidly that the enzyme hardly has a chance to blunt intoxication. Roine adds that taking aspirin after drinking probably does not increase blood alcohol levels, since the enzyme has already completed its oxidization task by that time.

Although the breakfast study focused on men, it may have particular significance for women, says Lieber. Earlier this year, the same researchers detected naturally lower activity levels of the gastric enzyme in women compared with men (SN: 1/20/90, p. 39). The team began an all-women version of its breakfast study this week and expects early results by January. "We hypothesize that when we give aspirin to women, they may have virtually no gastric [alcohol dehydrogenase] activity," Lieber says.

Roine notes that people who take aspirin with the gastric ulcer drugs cimetidine or ranitidine may face a double whammy from alcohol, since previous studies have shown that these drugs also reduce gastric alcohol dehydrogenase activity. He adds that his group plans clinical tests to verify in vitro results indicating that smaller aspirin doses, such as those prescribed to lower heart attack risk, also lower activity of the alcohol-degrading enzyme.

Original article:
Code:
http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m1200/is_n21_v138/ai_9145960/?tag=content;col1



Quote:
Aspirin ‘could cut liver damage’

A dose of aspirin may be able to prevent liver damage caused by paracetamol or heavy drinking, suggest researchers.

The Yale University team, writing in the Journal of Clinical Investigation, found aspirin cut death rates in mice given a paracetamol overdose.

They believe it interferes with a chemical pathway that triggers damaging inflammation within the organ.

However, the British Liver Trust said it was not yet proven to help humans.

Rates of liver cirrhosis have risen in the UK in recent years as people drink more alcohol, and paracetamol overdose, both deliberate and accidental, accounts for well over 100 deaths per year.

Scientists looking at how alcohol and paracetamol cause damage to the liver have found that a chain reaction of inflammation can be triggered after the initial damage caused by these two chemicals.

This inflammatory response can mean that the eventual damage to the organ is much greater.

The latest research found that mice were less likely to die after being given too much acetaminophen, the active ingredient in paracetamol, if they were also given a small dose of aspirin.

The scientists believe it works by blocking a chemical receptor in liver cells. It is this receptor which triggers the inflammatory response.

They isolated particular molecules, called TLR antagonists, which can also block this receptor, but believe that the cheapness of aspirin could make it a useful therapy.

Aspirin strategy

Dr Wajahat Mehal, who led the study, said: “Many agents such as drugs and alcohol can cause liver damage, and we have found two ways to block a central pathway responsible for such liver injury.

“Our strategy is to use aspirin on a daily basis, to prevent liver injury, but if it occurs, to use these TLR antagonists to treat it.”

He said: “This offers the exciting possibility of reducing a lot of pain and suffering in patients with liver disease, using a new and very practical approach.”

A spokesman for the British Liver Trust urged caution, however: “While we welcome any advances in protecting the liver from damage, we would urge anyone who has taken more than the prescribed dose of paracetamol to seek immediate medical advice.

“It is also important to remember that to date nothing has been clinically proven to protect the liver from alcohol abuse.

“We would also recommend that anyone proposing to take aspirin for more than a few days should consult their doctor for advice.”

NHS Direct warns that aspirin can cause irritation to the stomach lining and an increased risk of bleeding and ulceration.

Original article:
Code:
http://www.pharmafeed.com/tag/tlr-antagonists


And of course there was yesterday's article on how aspirin "may cut cancer deaths":

Code:
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20101207/ap_on_he_me/eu_med_aspirin_cancer
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thosquanta



Joined: 13 Feb 2006
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Location: nordeast

PostPosted: Wed Dec 08, 2010 5:14 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

tho i think aspirin regimines are pretty safe, you should consult the doc first. ya never know how it interferes with other crap goin on.
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whitebone



Joined: 07 Jul 2004
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PostPosted: Wed Dec 08, 2010 10:29 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'll drink to all of that!!!!
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Mild Thing



Joined: 18 Sep 2007
Posts: 2706

PostPosted: Mon Jan 23, 2012 1:14 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

::UPDATE::

Code:
ALT (SGPT) 10-50 IU/L


^^To decipher that code above in layman's terms, 10-50 is the normal range of liver value.

In 2009 mine was at 69 (I drank too much).

In 2010 with one 81mg aspirin per day (before drinking) I got that number down to 55 (which was still too high)

Today's test I measured in at 46, and I drink the same amount as last year- but I also take 162mg (81x2) of aspirin one hour prior to consumption.

Conclusion: aspirin appears to protect the liver.
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whitebone



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PostPosted: Mon Jan 23, 2012 4:45 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

There may be many variables that are affecting your "readings". Amount and type of food you may or may not eat before imbibing, your weight, types of alcohol you're drinking etc... Just a thought...
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Mild Thing



Joined: 18 Sep 2007
Posts: 2706

PostPosted: Tue Jan 24, 2012 2:04 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'm very consistent. I'm at the same weight I was last year at my last check-up, I drink empty, I drink the same amount. All of the factors (minus the juicing) were virtually identical. In fact, my blood tests were improved across the board. I asked the doctor if I might have improved my cholesterol (which was a little high) with my past 2 weeks of juicing and exercise. He highly doubted it, and said change could be seen in months, but not in only 2 weeks. He was wrong. My overall fasting cholesterol dropped by over 30 points, and my triglycerides cut to less than half, falling well within normal range. Now prior to 2 weeks ago my diet and exercise habits were the same as last year, so I highly suspect that had I not changed them the scores would be the same, or possibly worse as I was a few pounds heavier until I started juicing (beverage, not steroids).
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whitebone



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PostPosted: Tue Jan 24, 2012 2:47 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

If you haven't already, check out the movies/documentaries
"Food Matters" and "Forks over Knives"... Pretty "radical" stuff that is really just common sense.
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