Deaf Awareness
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Evil Angel



Joined: 18 Sep 2003
Posts: 1430
Location: down by the river

PostPosted: Fri Feb 11, 2005 1:56 am    Post subject: Deaf Awareness Reply with quote

I think this would be good one. So later on, I'll post good info.
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Evil Angel



Joined: 18 Sep 2003
Posts: 1430
Location: down by the river

PostPosted: Fri Feb 11, 2005 2:57 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Some of you know of my hearling loss. I found this tips...
1. Get the person's attention before you speak.
2. Do not put obstacles in front of your face. This includes coffee cups, hands, pencils, etc.
3. Do not have things in your mouth. This includes gum, candy, cigarettes, etc.
4. Speak clearly and at a moderate pace. Speak slowly, but naturally. Do not shout!
5. Use facial expressions, gestures, mimes, and whatever else helps make your message visible.
6. If you are not understood, try to say the same thing using different words. If that doesn't work, writing a few key words may help the person with hearing loss understand. If that doesn't work, write the whole sentence.
7. NEVER say "It's not important."
8. When you change the subject, be sure the person with hearing loss knows what the new subject is.
9. Do not stand with your back to a source of light.
10. When in doubt, ask the person with hearing loss what you can do to improve communications.
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Evil Angel



Joined: 18 Sep 2003
Posts: 1430
Location: down by the river

PostPosted: Fri Feb 11, 2005 2:58 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I may have freak out some of you by hugging, touching or looking at you directly. It's my way of communicating. So here's the good tips, below.

Rules of Social Interaction: It is essential to know general rules of both cultures, so an individual can have an opportunity to function well in any setting. Here are a few rules of interaction in the Deaf Culture.
Maintaining eye contact, not staring
Using attention getting devices such as waving, tapping the shoulder, stamping on the floor and turning the lights on and off
Being blunt, "telling it like it is"
Engaging in long departures from a social event
Hugging when greeting or leaving
Pointing is polite
Touching during conversations
Avoiding "excuse me" - when walking between two people who are signing, it is not necessary to say "excuse me"
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CreepyKarpis



Joined: 31 Aug 2004
Posts: 538
Location: Rubber Leg Street

PostPosted: Fri Feb 11, 2005 9:40 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

What?
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Evil Angel



Joined: 18 Sep 2003
Posts: 1430
Location: down by the river

PostPosted: Fri Feb 11, 2005 10:02 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

CreepyKarpis wrote:
What?

Asshole.... Cool
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CreepyKarpis



Joined: 31 Aug 2004
Posts: 538
Location: Rubber Leg Street

PostPosted: Fri Feb 11, 2005 10:06 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Are you hitting on me?
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trazadone



Joined: 28 Sep 2003
Posts: 4533
Location: lunch.

PostPosted: Tue Feb 15, 2005 9:02 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

EA, why can't you be in front of a light?
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Evil Angel



Joined: 18 Sep 2003
Posts: 1430
Location: down by the river

PostPosted: Tue Feb 15, 2005 9:58 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Ok I'll get right on it. No joke and please ask me questions and I'll answer it. Any experiences with other deaf folks, post it please.

Ignore CreepyKarpais, I know the guy and next time if I give him a ride home. He's going in the trunk. Cool
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Evil Angel



Joined: 18 Sep 2003
Posts: 1430
Location: down by the river

PostPosted: Tue Feb 15, 2005 9:59 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

trazadone wrote:
EA, why can't you be in front of a light?


with the light shining in my face, I can't read a person's lips. So I much rather have that person been in the light.
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Evil Angel



Joined: 18 Sep 2003
Posts: 1430
Location: down by the river

PostPosted: Tue Feb 15, 2005 10:02 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I started this thread on a different board...here's some good info from other folks..

"It's pretty easy to communicate with deaf and hard-of-hearing people, just remember to be sensitive to their needs and be prepared to repeat or restate if needed... it's a challenge they have to live with every day and their resourcefullness is admirable they develop ingenious ways to cope with the disability and normalize their experiences and relations with those around them."

"I've had tinnitus since I was 16 due to not taking care of my hearing. Trust me people, wear your earplugs or find out the hard way. I've had many hearing test done, and even though I don't have noticible hearing loss, I will always have ringing in my ears due to overexposure of loud music... Sometimes the hearing in my left ear will go out 75% and all I'll really be able to hear is an intense ringing that last about 7 seconds. I don't know why this happens, but it usually comes on 3 times a day. "

Wear your Ear Plugs at the Show!!!
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stu



Joined: 30 Sep 2003
Posts: 1122
Location: Pig's Eye, MN

PostPosted: Tue Feb 15, 2005 10:06 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

trazadone wrote:
EA, why can't you be in front of a light?


Imagine a cheesy interogation scene from a TV cop show. Or taking a picture with someone standing in front of the one source of light.

A singular source of light behind someone's head means their face is shadowed, making it hard to see the mouth.

Hey EA, you kind of answered this question once before, but I was wondering if you could expand on it some more. I've noticed in that when you write you sometimes get past, present, and future tenses turned around. I guess I understand how this may happen verbally, or with ASL, but don't you pick up on it from reading books and newspapers and such?

What is your level of hearing loss? I know you go to shows. What do you get out of it?
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Evil Angel



Joined: 18 Sep 2003
Posts: 1430
Location: down by the river

PostPosted: Tue Feb 15, 2005 10:10 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

It's common for deaf folks to get get past, present, and future tenses turned around. I don't hear enough of it but only use Visual. I'll have to research on that. Good question.

As for going to the show, I can't make out what they're singing about. I can hear but drives me nuts to hear metal racket tune and screaming into the microphone won't do it for me.
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Evil Angel



Joined: 18 Sep 2003
Posts: 1430
Location: down by the river

PostPosted: Tue Feb 15, 2005 10:17 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Since I'm the lipreader...so here's the tips. Just don't be talking to me when you're drunk as hell. Slurry words....Wink

If you are talking to someone who relies on lipreading, remember that it requires a lot of skill and concentration and can sometimes be tiring. Many words look similar on the lips. Some sounds are pronounced at the back of the throat and have no visible shape on the lips.

Making it easier for someone to lipread you

Find a suitable environment with good lighting, away from noise and distractions.

Sit or stand at the same level as the lipreader, and three to six feet away (one to two metres).

Face the light, or your face will be in shadow.

Make sure the lipreader is looking at you before you speak.
Introduce the topic of conversation.

Speak clearly at a moderate pace without raising your voice or over-emphasising your speech.

Use natural facial expressions, gestures and body language.
Keep your face visible. Do not put your hands near it or wear sunglasses - and do not turn away while you are talking.

Use plain English and repeat or rephrase something if the lipreader finds it difficult to follow you.

Check that the lipreader can follow you.

Be patient and take the time to communicate.
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Evil Angel



Joined: 18 Sep 2003
Posts: 1430
Location: down by the river

PostPosted: Tue Feb 15, 2005 10:28 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Level of my hearing loss is 75% but with hearing aids I gain 80% back.
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whitebone



Joined: 07 Jul 2004
Posts: 2898
Location: MINNEAPOLIS

PostPosted: Tue Feb 15, 2005 1:50 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I find pantomime the best way to communicate with the deaf. It's very universal too. Sign language I believe is not as universal, at least in my esperience. I worked at a place with two deaf women who didn't know english, but managed to communicate quite well with them and learned a thing or two.
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